Interleukin 10 treatment reduces fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C

Interleukin 10 treatment reduces fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C: a pilot trial of interferon nonresponders. Gastroenterology. 118:655-660.

Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a naturally occurring human protein that down-regulates the inflammatory response and may alter fibrosis (scarring) in the liver. These investigators from the University of Florida and Schering-Plough (the manufacturer of recombinant IL-10) tested the effects of recombinant IL-10 in 24 patients with chronic hepatitis C who did not respond to previous treatment with interferon alpha or interferon alpha-2b plus ribavirin. Subjects received in 4 or 8 micrograms per kilogram of recombinant IL-10 daily by injection for 3 months. Liver biopsies were performed before and after treatment.

Two subjects did not complete the study; the drug was well-tolerated in the other 22. Liver inflammation decreased in 19 of 22 subjects and liver fibrosis decreased in 14. Serum alanine aminotransferase activity became normal in 19 patients by the end of the study. Serum hepatitis C virus RNA concentrations did not change.

The results of this pilot study suggest that IL-10 may decrease inflammation and scarring in the livers of subjects infected with the hepatitis C virus. Larger placebo-controlled studies of IL-10 are indicated.

By Howard J. Worman, M. D.

Nelson, D. R., Lauwers, G. Y., Lau, J. Y. N., and Davis, G. L. 2000.

Copyright, 2000, Columbia University Division of Gastroenterology
Hepatitis D/Howard J. Worman, M. D.
Copyright, 2000, Columbia University Division of Gastroenterology
Current Papers in Liver Disease/Howard J. Worman, M. D.

 

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